Bret Stephens’s Suggestions for Op-Eds

New York Times’s Op-Ed writer Bret Stephens offers tips for aspiring Op-Ed that he’s learned over the years as an editor, op-ed writer and columnist.  He begins with this one:

“1) A wise editor once observed that the easiest decision a reader can make is to stop reading. This means that every sentence has to count in grabbing the reader’s attention, starting with the first. Get to the point: Why does your topic matter? Why should it matter today? And why should the reader care what you, of all people, have to say about it?”

These suggestions may be useful for writing Activity 5.7 Write an Op-Ed Argument on page 171 in Praxis 3e.

For 14 more tips, see Stephens’s essay at https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/25/opinion/tips-for-aspiring-op-ed-writers.html?mcubz=0&_r=0

 

 

Read Like Your Audience Would Read

This tote’s designers may have intended to say, “My Favorite Color is Glitter,” but their poor font choice conflated the “G” of glitter with the “L,” turning their design into a statement that most would read as “My Favorite color is Hitler.”  A simple change of font would have solved the problem.  The bag’s image

Hitler went viral on Twitter, with people offering comments like these:

“How did the designers Nazi that.”

“Waking up to see the führer this tweet has created”

 

 

Source: http://mashable.com/2017/07/24/my-favorite-color-is-hitler-tote-bag/?utm_cid=mash-com-fb-main-link#G24Npz8aqsqF